The Two Escobars.

17 Jul

-insert continuous whining about summer heat here-

So a while back I tweeted about a documentary on ESPN called The Two Escobars. I planned on watching it, and I did kinda watch it, but I wasn’t really carefully watching it. Basically, I sat in front of the tv and had my mind elsewhere and didn’t understand anything I saw.

This morning, it was re-aired on ESPN, and for those who don’t know me, Saturday mornings are like boring shit for me. I don’t really do anything. I wake up and I watch Saturday morning television. That is all I do. So yeah, I was paying pretty close attention this time.

I must say, I probably cried the entire two hours I spent watching this documentary. Like literally tears were pouring down my face.

Basically, it details the rise and fall of soccer in Colombia, a country ravaged by drug dealing and corruption and violence. All this was going on before I was born for the most part, and it’s something that not a lot of people focus their attention on.

The two Escobars talked about in this documentary are notorious druglord Pablo Escobar and soccer player Andres Escobar.

I think Pablo Escobar was one of those people who raise some important questions on morality and right and wrong. Yes, he was responsible for the deaths of thousands of people, and he was – simply put – a terrorist who bombed cars and government buildings and maintained power through fear. Yes, he bribed government officials for his own good, to prevent the Colombian government from extraditing him to the US. But he also directed millions of his own fortune to help the poor, building houses and churches for them, encouraging the development of soccer in Colombia. He’s the reason why the Colombian NT ever reached the highs that they attained. I’ll never forget the scene when his death was announced. The poor were devastated, and they mourned him like a hero; they said that it was the rich who were celebrating the loss, and the poor were the ones who were going to suffer again because Pablo Escobar, a criminal, was the one person who gave a shit about their well being and helped them survive. So yeah, he was a bad person. A terrible person. He ignited a war in Colombia that left the country in shambles. But there’s two sides to every story, and it was absolutely heartbreaking to actually see the other side, see the people from the lowest class crying over the loss of someone who was their savior.

The documentary also suggests that had Pablo Escobar been alive after the 1994 World Cup, Andres Escobar would not have been killed.

Pablo Escobar loved soccer, and even when he was on the run from the authorities, he always made time to pay attention to the matches. The Colombian NT was basically built on his funds, and the program flourished. It’s really inspiring to see a group of athletes who play for something other than money. The 22-man squad played for the country, to represent Colombia as something other than a country of drug dealers and blood money. And they did so well throughout the qualifying stages.

And then they made it to the finals and found themselves trapped and fearful for their lives because of all the pressures at home. Their families were threatened, every little mistake was magnified. How can they succeed when they couldn’t get the fear out of their minds?

And then Andres’s own goal. I mean I’m not gonna lie. It was pretty bad. Like really really bad. But how can you blame him when he’s flipping out because he’s worried about the safety of himself and all his loved ones?

The documentary concludes that Andres wasn’t killed for the own goal but over an argument with some druglords who didn’t like being challenged. They had all been drinking, and no one needed to get hurt. Just really unfortunate and unnecessary, but that’s Colombia’s recent history for you.

At the very end, it’s revealed that Colombia dropped in FIFA rankings from #4 to #34 between 1994 and 1998. Also, this year, an overwhelming majority of Colombia’s club soccer teams are bankrupt, and it is highly unlikely that the country will ever challenge for the World Cup again.

I’m glad I really learned something from this documentary. If you do ever catch it on ESPN, or if you can find it online, please take some time and watch it. It really touched me, and it was thought-provoking and absolutely brilliant. Like I said, I could not stop crying. During dinner, I was telling my dad about it, and my voice broke a couple of times because I was going to cry again. (Yes, I’m an emotional person, but I attribute my tears to more than just that.)

On a lighter note,

I went to Walmart today for the first time in a while, and I spotted a man sporting a nifty NASCAR tshirt. STOP JUDGING, I KNOW YOU’RE ALL DOING IT. WALMART IS NOT ONLY FOR REDNECKS K?!?!!?!?

I heard Despicable Me and Inception are good films, I should check them out soon. HAHA I always say I’m going to watch all these movies and I never do… goodness if I watched all the movies I wanted to, it would just be… bad.

I want a new phone. LOL I think I talk about this every month or so on here. BUT YEAH MY CONTRACT EXPIRES ABOUT THE SAME TIME I GRADUATE AND SO I’M GOING TO TRY AND SCORE SOMETHING AWESOME. BUT THAT’S A LITTLE LESS THAN A YEAR FROM NOW. SADFACE. SO CLOSE YET SO FARRRRRRRR

Lulz I love talking about Pique and his herpderpness with people. It just kinda makes my day 🙂

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